We have lots of great artifacts and pictures, but we bring history to life in other ways. For instance, our outstanding “Bit of History” lecture series features great facts and stories told by outstanding speakers on a variety of topics. One of those lectures discussed the historical weather patterns of North Texas and how those can be used to help predict and prepare for future weather. Another popular past lecture covered the history of camels (that’s right, camels) in North Texas. The “Bit of History” series usually takes place in our Theater (pictured to the right).

It might not seem like weather, camels, auto racing, fashion, music, and wildlife have anything to do with history, but they do. Think about how these things have impacted our own lives and then realize that they had to have had an impact on people that came before us. That’s part of what we show here at the Museum of North Texas History, and our programs and events help us to do that.

The Theater, which seats 50 people comfortably, is a great venue for video presentations like historical documentaries and films and other multimedia presentations.  In the near future we plan on making even more use of the Theater to show that history is interesting, exciting, and fun.  We are building quite the video library, and some of our videos prove the point that history involves so many aspects of our lives.  For instance, we have videos chronicling the racing careers of champions (and Wichitans) ​Eddie Hill and Lloyd Ruby and the music of Bob Wills.

Sometimes we have programs and events that require more space, and our Assembly Hall fills that need.  The Assembly Hall has hosted musical concerts (pictured below), a fashion show of vintage originals and historically accurate reproductions, and even a dance.  We can also present multimedia presentations in the Assembly Hall, ​like the great presentation in 2011 on Texas Wildlife by the official State Photographer of Texas, Wyman Meinzer.

The Theater and Assembly Hall are available for rent for meetings.  Contact the Museum for more information.